Tag Archives: biden

Congress isn’t just a “better way” to legislate; it’s the only way

Biden-pen-signing-Fox-5-DC-1200x630Kudos to the Editorial Board of the New York Times for putting aside the likely preferences of most of their readership and charging President Biden to, “Ease Up on the Executive Actions, Joe.” The piece argues, on constitutional and practical grounds, that presidents must work with Congress to establish legislation to carry out their agendas, rather than seeking to do so through executive actions.

While well-intentioned, the piece is flawed and self-contradictory, beginning with its subtitle, which asserts Biden, “is right to not let his agenda be held hostage.”

No, he isn’t.

The premise underpinning this statement, shared by much of the public, is that a new president’s policy agenda should be enacted by Congress based solely on the president’s election. This is backwards. The idea Congress is merely a rubber stamp for the will the executive is straight out of Hobbes’ Leviathan and foreign to the U.S. Constitution. Rather, the Constitution presumes legislation originates in Congress, exercising only those powers granted it, with the president’s role to either assent and execute, or veto.

While politicians love to throw around Rousseauian language like “will of the people,” the founders clearly rejected Rousseau’s vision of “the total alienation of each associate, together with all of his rights” to some “general will.” Our system is based upon the idea most natural rights are inalienable, no matter how large a majority seeks to infringe them.

The Constitution presumes there is no “agenda” to be pursued by either Congress or the president, but rather a narrow list of powers to be exercised by Congress in legislation and the president in execution. Whether the government should be involved in new areas is beyond the powers granted to either branch. They are reserved to the amendment process, which is difficult by design.

It has become routine for presidential candidates to promise sweeping changes they have no power to deliver. This has led the people to increasingly believe merely electing the presidential candidate of their choice should result in those changes. When it doesn’t, they blame Congress for “not getting anything done.” This is also backwards.

When a bill is proposed in Congress and voted down, Congress is indeed “getting something done.” If there were anything at all to the idea of a will of the people, that will would be found in the diverse opinions of the Congress, not the unitary will of the executive. The rejection of legislation suggested by the president is as representative of the people as its passing.

To comprehend the reason for the bitter divisiveness in American politics and its increasing propensity for violence, one should not only look to the vast expansion of centralized power over the peoples of vastly different cultures within the American federation, but to the relentless migration of power from the legislative branch to the executive. When one’s whole way of life could turn on the election of one man or woman to the presidency, that election takes on an outsized importance even to those normally disinclined to politics. The legal instability inherent in executive supremacy only adds fuel to the fire.

No, Congress is not a “better” way to legislate. It’s the only way. And for all the talk of defending democracy, a true belief in our republican system would respect the nay votes equally to the yeas.

Tom Mullen is the author of Where Do Conservatives and Liberals Come From? And What Ever Happened to Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness? Part One and A Return to Common Sense: Reawakening Liberty in the Inhabitants of America.

Impeachment Hearings: The elephant in the room Republicans and Democrats won’t acknowledge

Ukraine_0“Republicans Try to Shift Focus to Hunter Biden During Debate on Trump Charges” complains the New York Times, as if the younger Biden’s conduct is completely immaterial to the impeachment case against President Trump. It seems having a father running for president is an absolute defense against…well, anything.

Judge: “On the charge of murder in the first degree, how does the defendant plead?”

Defense Attorney: “Your honor, his father is running for president.”

Judge: “Case dismissed. Next on the docket?”

But even more bizarre than the Democrats exasperation at examining Biden’s conduct related to Trump’s request for an investigation by the Ukrainian government is the complete silence of all involved on the real elephant in the room: Washington, D.C.’s involvement in creating that government in the first place.

In case you’ve forgotten, Washington employs regime-change-by-mass-protest far more often than the clumsy bombing/invasion method (although they’ve done plenty of that, too). Wars cost money, lives and international goodwill. Better to work through “non-governmental organizations” (NGOs) – a.k.a. CIA front groups – to foment unrest, riots, or open rebellion. The Obama administration elevated it to an art form, using it throughout the Middle East’s “Arab Spring,” and perfected it in Ukraine, according to Consortium News.

By the way, if you don’t think that’s what is going on in Hong Kong today, then I have a really nice bridge to sell you. Granted, the empire’s goals are more modest there. They certainly couldn’t achieve separating Hong Kong from China; but they managed to get a slew of “pro-democracy” candidates elected in local races. The Chinese aren’t stupid; they know what’s going on.

Well, back in 2014, that’s exactly what went on in Ukraine. Democratically-elected president Victor Yanukovych dragged his heels on a trade deal with the European Union which would have affected Ukraine’s relationship with Russia, its largest trading partner. Since keeping Russia on its knees has been the goal of the U.S. and it’s so-called NATO allies since the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, no resistance to the trade deal or absorption of Ukraine into NATO would be tolerated.

So, the Obama administration did in Ukraine what it had been doing throughout the Middle East. It ran the regime-change-by-protest program. We know this because Obama administration officials were recorded talking about it, the recording later leaked to the public. Yanukovych fled the country, new elections were held, and a pro-EU, pro-NATO U.S. puppet was elected. All this happened just before Hunter Biden joined the board of Ukrainian gas company, Burisma Holdings Ltd.

So, Washington overthrows an elected government, installs a NATO puppet, and begins sending said puppet foreign aid to resist “Russian aggression.” Some of that foreign aid flows to Burisma, which is paying then-Vice President Biden’s son $50,000 per month for his complete lack of knowledge of or experience in the fossil fuels industry.

Nothing to see here, folks.

Now, that is a story the public would find compelling, especially because it’s true. If the Republicans really wanted to see Deep State heads roll; if they really wanted to “drain the Swamp,” this is the story they’d tell. But they won’t and neither will the national media.

The Republicans, Democrats, and the national media are all agents of and apologists for the rotting, bankrupt American empire. And they’ll take us all down with it when it falls, rather than speak against it, even when doing so could help their team.

Tom Mullen is the author of Where Do Conservatives and Liberals Come From? And What Ever Happened to Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness? Part One and A Return to Common Sense: Reawakening Liberty in the Inhabitants of America.